Ever since 2001, when a constitutional court ruling denied the the Love Parade it's status as a political demonstration, it's financing has been shaky. Prior to that ruling, the city of Berlin had to bear the cost of cleaning up the mess after the Parade. Now, the organizers are responsible. The net cost is close to 1 million euros which in the years after the ruling was covered by sponsors. While that may have made the parade even more commercial than before, it could take place and still attracted between 500,000 and 1 million people. However, when more and more sponsors withdrew in the midst of an economic downturn, the 2004 Love Parade was in serious jeopardy. A frantic search for new sponsors ensued and the city of Berlin was begged for help. To no avail. Shortsighted city officials were unwilling to cover the remaining financing gap of about 300,000 euros. In May 2004 the final announcement proclaimed the death of the Love Parade 2004.

Yet the party community rose to the challenge. The Berlin clubs introduced the 'Loveweek' to celebrate electronic music without the Parade, which had formed the basis for a massive party and DJ lineup in the week leading up to and including the LP weekend.

What's more, the party magazine Partysan officially registered a political demonstration for the date of the cancelled Love Parade Under the motto "Fight the Power – Club Culture vs Ignorance" it called all party people to demonstrate in Berlin against ignorance and bigotry vis-a-vis the Club Culture and for the return of the Love Parade

The demonstration started Saturday afternoon, July 10, 2004 with 5 small music trucks and one large political truck, from which speeches were to be held. And it rained. The crowd of about 1,000-2,000 people that showed up seemed a little small and given the rain hopes for more didn't seem too realistic at that point. Yet the general mood was one of optimism and determination. After the first speech the music started and the march began moving, people following the trucks, dancing, screaming, hands in the air. Saturday shoppers looked on in mild bewilderment. As the march progressed, the sun decided to turn a friendly eye on the protesters and the crowd continued to swell. By the end the march was massive and reached 10,000 to 20,000 people, depending on who's estimate it was. The march was interrupted several times for more speeches from the main truck, each enticing cheers and sneers form the crowd. The growing crowd produced a vibe that hasn't been experienced in such intensity since the old days of the techno movement. It was a truly back to the roots happening. The whole thing was such a PLURry affair, though that term was never expressly used, it engrossed everyone, making the participants that one large family again that it had almost forgotten to be.

My personal perception of the demonstration was that of an experience of a lifetime. The intense vibe sent chills down my spine, gave me goose bumps countless times. When Paul van Dyk, towards the end, played 'For An Angel', that beautiful tune with such meaning to this demonstration, it marked the unsurpassed high point of the march and the entire weekend.

The undisputable success of this demonstration forcefully made the point that techno is by no means dead, that the party community still stands for its values, that it can pull off a politically meaningful demonstration and a draw sizeable crowds without commercial background and support.

Long live the Love Parade" />
Forum list. Calendar Articles, reviews and editorials. Pictures Listen to music and watch videos. See a listing of our DJ's / Producers.
Join our community and access additional features.Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences.View a list of our members.Answers to some frequently asked questions about using the message board.SearchFind all of the latest posts since your latest visit.Private messagingLog out of the message board
The Love Parade Is Dead, Long Live The Love Parade: Fight The Power Demonstration, Berlin
by Overseas: 07-10-2004


Ever since 2001, when a constitutional court ruling denied the the Love Parade it's status as a political demonstration, it's financing has been shaky. Prior to that ruling, the city of Berlin had to bear the cost of cleaning up the mess after the Parade. Now, the organizers are responsible. The net cost is close to 1 million euros which in the years after the ruling was covered by sponsors. While that may have made the parade even more commercial than before, it could take place and still attracted between 500,000 and 1 million people. However, when more and more sponsors withdrew in the midst of an economic downturn, the 2004 Love Parade was in serious jeopardy. A frantic search for new sponsors ensued and the city of Berlin was begged for help. To no avail. Shortsighted city officials were unwilling to cover the remaining financing gap of about 300,000 euros. In May 2004 the final announcement proclaimed the death of the Love Parade 2004.

Yet the party community rose to the challenge. The Berlin clubs introduced the 'Loveweek' to celebrate electronic music without the Parade, which had formed the basis for a massive party and DJ lineup in the week leading up to and including the LP weekend.

What's more, the party magazine Partysan officially registered a political demonstration for the date of the cancelled Love Parade Under the motto "Fight the Power – Club Culture vs Ignorance" it called all party people to demonstrate in Berlin against ignorance and bigotry vis-a-vis the Club Culture and for the return of the Love Parade

The demonstration started Saturday afternoon, July 10, 2004 with 5 small music trucks and one large political truck, from which speeches were to be held. And it rained. The crowd of about 1,000-2,000 people that showed up seemed a little small and given the rain hopes for more didn't seem too realistic at that point. Yet the general mood was one of optimism and determination. After the first speech the music started and the march began moving, people following the trucks, dancing, screaming, hands in the air. Saturday shoppers looked on in mild bewilderment. As the march progressed, the sun decided to turn a friendly eye on the protesters and the crowd continued to swell. By the end the march was massive and reached 10,000 to 20,000 people, depending on who's estimate it was. The march was interrupted several times for more speeches from the main truck, each enticing cheers and sneers form the crowd. The growing crowd produced a vibe that hasn't been experienced in such intensity since the old days of the techno movement. It was a truly back to the roots happening. The whole thing was such a PLURry affair, though that term was never expressly used, it engrossed everyone, making the participants that one large family again that it had almost forgotten to be.

My personal perception of the demonstration was that of an experience of a lifetime. The intense vibe sent chills down my spine, gave me goose bumps countless times. When Paul van Dyk, towards the end, played 'For An Angel', that beautiful tune with such meaning to this demonstration, it marked the unsurpassed high point of the march and the entire weekend.

The undisputable success of this demonstration forcefully made the point that techno is by no means dead, that the party community still stands for its values, that it can pull off a politically meaningful demonstration and a draw sizeable crowds without commercial background and support.

Long live the Love Parade

Twitter Facebook MySpace Digg

comments: [discuss this article] [previous articles]

Forums  
Music Forums:
Life and Everything Else:

editorials










































music reviews



















party reviews
































































































































 


Groovanauts.com is a public message board protected by the First Amendment of the United States of America. Groovanauts.com's owners and its operators take absolutely no responsibility for the actions, claims or statements made by any of our members. Our members and moderators are neither employees of Groovanauts.com nor its legal representatives.