One of the best sets I’ve heard from PvD in the States and quite possibly Set of the Year. Easily on par with his WMC Space sets (last WMC’s was a Mulligan though). PvD took over for Bonham, who threw down in his own right, and cranked it to Eleven from the get go. There was no easing into it. There was no fluff. Just instant, hard, dark relentless trance and techno with some prog/house tossed in from beginning to end. I suppose one can say that Paul spun a “Berlin” set versus the usual stuff he spins in the US. He was spinning tracks he personally liked, not ones he had to in order to sell records or indoctrinate newbies into EDM with something more accessible. No repeating “Nothing But You” every other hour so that we’d all be extorted into buying his album just to get him to stop. In fact, PvD was so animated and into finally playing nothing but his own personal taste in music, I’d have thought he might have finally broken down and ate a bunch of pills. Hell, I was practically expecting him to bust out a set of glow sticks and offer to give me a backrub in between tracks.

While I heard many people could not get into Roxy by the middle of the night, for those of us that got there early enough, it helped make the party as great as it was. There’s no fun in being crammed like sardines into a venue filed to about 3 times it’s legal capacity. Doesn’t matter how good the music is. Unlike at PvD’s previous NYC gig at Crobar, there was ample room for everyone to move around freely and dance like there’s no tomorrow…Well, I guess technically, that’s kinda literal as far as Roxy goes. Word is that this NYC institution has been sold and is going to be demolished soon. That place has been around so long that our parents probably spilled their cocaine all over that dancefloor and got their spunk all over the bathroom stalls.

I’m not sure whether Paul was aware of Roxy’s fate, but he certainly spun as if he was. It was a proper sendoff. No holds barred. While he spun many of his favorite tracks spanning the entirety of his career, much of his selection was new or relatively unheard (around here). PvD didn’t drop anything that he had beaten into a pulp by now, aside from a track or two like “Crush.” Truth be told, surprisingly enough, I’m STILL not sick of that track. Then again, I might be biased cause I know Second Sun personally and had them perform at one of my parties a while back. Had Paul shared a few pints with me and spun in my living room, maybe I wouldn’t hate it so much if he did drop “Nothing But You.” Good for him that he didn’t though. I had been promising to everyone for years that if I heard him spin that ONE more time, I was gonna bum rush the booth, toss his PowerBook to the floor and do the Polka dance on top of it. This time, I was actually in good range to follow through. We took over the spot to the left of the booth, behind the projection screens. So I was sitting on the stage on the same level as the open booth. I could have easily made it before security would beat me down. At the very least, I could have reached over to PvD and poked him with a stick if I heard that intro or maybe taunted him. Instead, I spent the entire night jumping around like a giddy school girl, grinning from ear to ear cause she just found out that Johnny McCool has a crush on her.

I think the fact that so many of us were so close to the booth that Paul could see just how much fun we were having definitely contributed to his set. Granted, I might just be giving us way too much credit, but PvD was routinely looking over at us, grinning and jumping around almost as much as we were. When a DJ is enjoying his job, it definitely reflects in his music. This wasn’t the robotic van Dyk emotionlessly cuing up some fluffy cheese track cause his market research people told him he had to appeal to an “American” audience. In fact, after seen him all over the world for the majority of his career, I had never seen him get into his set and the crowd that much. I guess he’ll miss Roxy as much as the rest of us." />
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Paul van Dyk @ Roxy, NYC
by translucent: 11-11-2005

One of the best sets I’ve heard from PvD in the States and quite possibly Set of the Year. Easily on par with his WMC Space sets (last WMC’s was a Mulligan though). PvD took over for Bonham, who threw down in his own right, and cranked it to Eleven from the get go. There was no easing into it. There was no fluff. Just instant, hard, dark relentless trance and techno with some prog/house tossed in from beginning to end. I suppose one can say that Paul spun a “Berlin” set versus the usual stuff he spins in the US. He was spinning tracks he personally liked, not ones he had to in order to sell records or indoctrinate newbies into EDM with something more accessible. No repeating “Nothing But You” every other hour so that we’d all be extorted into buying his album just to get him to stop. In fact, PvD was so animated and into finally playing nothing but his own personal taste in music, I’d have thought he might have finally broken down and ate a bunch of pills. Hell, I was practically expecting him to bust out a set of glow sticks and offer to give me a backrub in between tracks.

While I heard many people could not get into Roxy by the middle of the night, for those of us that got there early enough, it helped make the party as great as it was. There’s no fun in being crammed like sardines into a venue filed to about 3 times it’s legal capacity. Doesn’t matter how good the music is. Unlike at PvD’s previous NYC gig at Crobar, there was ample room for everyone to move around freely and dance like there’s no tomorrow…Well, I guess technically, that’s kinda literal as far as Roxy goes. Word is that this NYC institution has been sold and is going to be demolished soon. That place has been around so long that our parents probably spilled their cocaine all over that dancefloor and got their spunk all over the bathroom stalls.

I’m not sure whether Paul was aware of Roxy’s fate, but he certainly spun as if he was. It was a proper sendoff. No holds barred. While he spun many of his favorite tracks spanning the entirety of his career, much of his selection was new or relatively unheard (around here). PvD didn’t drop anything that he had beaten into a pulp by now, aside from a track or two like “Crush.” Truth be told, surprisingly enough, I’m STILL not sick of that track. Then again, I might be biased cause I know Second Sun personally and had them perform at one of my parties a while back. Had Paul shared a few pints with me and spun in my living room, maybe I wouldn’t hate it so much if he did drop “Nothing But You.” Good for him that he didn’t though. I had been promising to everyone for years that if I heard him spin that ONE more time, I was gonna bum rush the booth, toss his PowerBook to the floor and do the Polka dance on top of it. This time, I was actually in good range to follow through. We took over the spot to the left of the booth, behind the projection screens. So I was sitting on the stage on the same level as the open booth. I could have easily made it before security would beat me down. At the very least, I could have reached over to PvD and poked him with a stick if I heard that intro or maybe taunted him. Instead, I spent the entire night jumping around like a giddy school girl, grinning from ear to ear cause she just found out that Johnny McCool has a crush on her.

I think the fact that so many of us were so close to the booth that Paul could see just how much fun we were having definitely contributed to his set. Granted, I might just be giving us way too much credit, but PvD was routinely looking over at us, grinning and jumping around almost as much as we were. When a DJ is enjoying his job, it definitely reflects in his music. This wasn’t the robotic van Dyk emotionlessly cuing up some fluffy cheese track cause his market research people told him he had to appeal to an “American” audience. In fact, after seen him all over the world for the majority of his career, I had never seen him get into his set and the crowd that much. I guess he’ll miss Roxy as much as the rest of us.


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